June 24, 2016

 

Interview with Michael Gelb, author of the book Brain Power: Improve Your Mind as You Age

 

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Mike Carruthers:
You've probably heard that after age 30 mental function declines, that's been a long standing belief that is not necessarily true.

 

Michael Gelb:
Much of what passes for memory loss with age is really a depletion of oxygen supply to the brain. And that depletion is a function of a sedentary lifestyle and not actually using your brain.
 


Michael Gelb


June 23, 2016

 

Interview with Tim Wilson, author of the book Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

 

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Mike Carruthers:
Changing your life for the better, how do you do that? One way is called the do good, be good approach.

 

Tim Wilson:
Which is kind of counterintuitive but it suggests that sometimes the best way to edit our stories is to change our behavior first. That if we act like a person we want to be that our story follows that rather than preceding it. 
 


Tim Wilson


June 22, 2016

 

Interview with Tim Wilson, author of the book Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

 

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Mike Carruthers:
Who you are or rather who you think you are is really the result of stories you tell yourself.

 

Tim Wilson:
So if we want to change in some way we can do so by trying to edit those stories.
 


Tim Wilson


June 21, 2016

 

Interview with James Hogan, author of the book I’m Right & You’re An Idiot

 

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Mike Carruthers:
You’ve probably noticed how nasty the political conversation has gotten and the same is true of debates on almost any controversial issue. Why?

 

James Hogan:
I think one of the reasons is it’s more effective. One of the things Noam Chomsky said to me was if you can’t win an argument shriek, call people names.
 


James Hogan


June 20, 2016

 

Interview with Kasey Wallis, author of the book Far Reaching Parameters

 

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Mike Carruthers:

Fomo it’s a real word in the oxford English dictionary. Fomo is the fear of missing out.

 

Kasey Wallis:

It’s a very real phenomenon especially for those who are truly addicted to the mobile devices and they are constantly engaged in an ongoing news feed.

 


Kasey Wallis


June 17, 2016

 

Interview with Gary Taubes, author of the book Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It (Vintage)

 

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Mike Carruthers:
What types of foods make people fat? Well the answer to that question has actually changed over time.

 

Gary Taubes:
Up until the 1960tys the conventional wisdom was that carbohydrates rich foods make you fat; potatoes, pastas, rice, beer, sodas – anything with sugar in it.
 


Gary Taubes


June 16, 2016

 

Interview with Carl Richards, author of the book The Behavior Gap: Simple Ways to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money

 

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Mike Carruthers:
Have you ever looked back and realized that some of your money choices may not have been the smartest.

 

Carl Richards:
Obviously it’s not because we’re stupid. It’s just because we’re genetically hard-wired to make silly decisions. But one of the classic ones is buying something that everybody else wants and selling something that nobody else wants to own.
 


Carl Richards


June 15, 2016

 

Interview with Kristi Hedges, author of the book The Power Presence

 

Mike Carruthers:
You’re personal presence it’s a hard concept to define and yet…

 

Kristi Hedges:
We’re all experts at other people’s presence we know when someone walks into the room we can almost feel what their presence is and how their command is of a room and the energy that they bring into the room. However if someone says to you what’s your presence? You’re probably going to stumble a little bit in trying to describe it.

 


Kristi Hedges


June 14, 2016

 

Interview with Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD, author of the book The Stress Solution

 

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Mike Carruthers:
If you worry a lot you have a lot of company.

 

Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD:

Half of American’s say that they are awake at night due to stress, anticipating stress for the next day.  75% of American’s say they experience stress on a daily basis and it is based on worry about what’s going to happen.
 


Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD


June 13, 2016

 

Interview with Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD, author of the book The Stress Solution

 

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Mike Carruthers:
You know what stress feels like but do you know why you’re feeling that way?

 

Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD:
Stress really is produced mostly by misperception when we’re perceiving inaccurately we produce stress and we produce the stress hormone cortisol. And when we do that we can’t see things very clearly and we tend to perceive in distorted ways.
 


Arthur Ciaramicoli, PhD


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