Something You Should Know about Cooking and the Kitchen


Food Fraud

August 8, 2016
 

Interview with Larry Olmstead author of  Real Food/Fake Food

www.realfoodfakefood.com

 

______________________

 

Mike Carruthers:
There is something called food fraud – you’re a victim of it and it is a big deal.

 

Larry Olmstead:
The Michigan State University Food Fraud Initiative estimates $50 Billion (with a B). 10% of the commercially available food in our country is subject to some sort of adulteration.
 


Larry Olmstead

Food Fraud - Part 2

August 9, 2016
 

Interview with Larry Olmstead author of  Real Food/Fake Food

www.realfoodfakefood.com

 

______________________
 

Mike Carruthers:

Seafood fraud is a real thing and it’s a big thing.

 

Larry Olmstead:
When you buy red snapper at a restaurant or at retail, you don’t get it 94% of the time. So like I don’t even know as I’ve ever had red snapper even though I’ve ordered it.
 


Larry Olmstead

How To Cook The Best Steak Ever

July 29, 2016

 

Interview with David Joachim, author of the book The Science of Good Food: The Ultimate Reference on How Cooking Works

 

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Mike Carruthers:
To cook a really good steak you first need to understand some food science.

 

David Joachim:
What is so delicious about grilled steak or just about any grilled food is the browning on the surface.
 


David Joachim

Kitchen Hacks

January 21, 2016

 

Interview with Jack Bishop Chief Creative Officer of America's Test Kitchen and contributor to the book Kitchen Hacks: How Clever Cooks Get Things Done

 

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Mike Carruthers:
Who wouldn’t want to be more efficient and spend less time in the kitchen? And a good place to start is with your knives.

 

Jack Bishop:
More time gets spent trying to work with a dull knife. And it just means that that onion is going to take that much longer.
 


Jack Bishop

Secrets Of Making Food Taste Better

August 6, 2015

 

Interview with George Erdosh, author of the book What Recipes Don't Tell You

 

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Mike Carruthers:
When it comes to improving the flavor of food one important key to any recipe is browning.

 

George Erdosh:
Recipes start, almost always, brown the meat first. And that browning precipitates powerful flavor enhancing reaction which gives flavor to food.
 


George Erdosh

The Water You Drink

July 9, 2015

 

Interview with Dr. James Symons, author of the book Plain Talk about Drinking Water

 

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Mike Carruthers:
Nothing is more important to your survival than the water you drink which is one reason why so many people buy bottled water.

 

Dr. James Symons:
To take water on a hike or something in a bottle so you can hydrate yourself is fine but to buy bottled water because you’re afraid of what comes out of the tap is just wrong.
 


Dr. James Symons

Food Science For Better Cooking

March 6, 2015

 

Interview with Russ Parsons, author of the book How to Read a French Fry: And Other Stories of Intriguing Kitchen Science 

 

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Mike Carruthers:
In the world of cooking, it seems common wisdom that you should you only cook vegetables lightly, al dente.

 

Russ Parsons:
The al dente vegetable, I think, is one of the things that cooks really have a lot to answer for.
 


Russ Parsons

Essential Food Facts

September 26, 2014

 

Interview with Perla Meyers, author of the book How to Peel a Peach: And 1,001 Other Things Every Good Cook Needs to Know

 

________________

 

Mike Carruthers:
Did you know that a dash of salt in any cake you bake is going to make it taste better?

 

Perla Meyers
Not only in cakes in all desserts everything that is a fruit dessert, if you don’t want salt you add lemon because what you’re looking for is complexity of flavor.

 


Perla Meyers

Expert Outdoor Cooking

July 31, 2014

 

Interview with Adam Reid, author of the book The Best Recipe: Grilling and Barbecue

 

________________

 

Mike Carruthers:
When you're cooking steaks and burgers on a grill about the worst thing you can do is press down on them with a spatula.

 

Andrew Reid:
Because you're just going to press all the juices out of there and that's what you want in the food.
 


Adam Reid

Better Outdoor Cooking

June 26, 2014

 

Interview with Chef Todd Mohr Founder of www.WebCookingClasses.com

 

________________

 

Mike Carruthers:
Cooking on the grill outside is in many ways harder than cooking the kitchen. For one thing food tends to stick to the grill.

 

Chef Todd Mohr:
People complain to me about that all of the time. How do I get things to stop sticking? Well that’s one of the most important things is to #1 get that grill very hot to begin with.
 


Chef Todd Mohr

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